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> Pennsylvania RR Decs
pjb
post Aug 24 2004, 01:42 AM
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The Pennsylvania RRs 'I' class 2-10-0s were vast in both numbers and
size for the wheel arrangement. What I would like to know is how they
decided upon the number and placement of blind (i.e. flangeless)
driving wheel sets , because various combinations of flanged/blind
drivers appeared on these locos.
Did this just "happen", as result of a particular shops decision
making, or was it based upon some regional/divisional policy(s)
based upon physical plant constraints? Are there any PennRoad fans
that have seen written policy statements/suggestions from CMOs or
other controlling officers on this subject?
Thank You, Peter Boylan
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cjbrock
post Aug 24 2004, 04:13 AM
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Since the purpose of blind drivers is to allow the locomotive to negotiate sharper radius curves than it could with an all-flanged wheelbase, it would probably have depended on the curvature profile of the division the locomotive was assigned to. Obviously it would have to have always been one of the three middle drivers as the outer pairs need flanges to lead into curves in forward and reverse.

I've got no Pennsy documentation indicating how the choice was made. You would think they'd have to be careful with variations in case the loco wandered off the division. Maybe that shows just how rarely engines did move from division to division.


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tomfassett
post Aug 29 2004, 01:57 AM
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I wondered about this myself after noticing that the picture captions in one of my old Locomotive Quarterly books from the 70s made the distinction of the placement of the flangeless wheels. Seems there were definitely some differences in which wheels got the treatment. I couldn't gain enough info from the article to understand if this were region specific or just the product of different shop mentalities. Somewhere, someone has to know why they did this... [?:|]

Tom F
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cjbrock
post Sep 2 2004, 06:34 PM
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I did a little more research on these (ok, I asked a friend who has a lot bigger library than mine on steam engines!). The word is they came from the factory with the drivers on axles 2, 3 and 4 blind: flanges on only the leading and trailing wheels.

It's interesting that would change as the engines were shopped.


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