IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Cork Roadbed - How do you lay it?
Railway Bob
post Dec 4 2002, 06:20 AM
Post #1


Crew Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 94
Joined: 19-November 02
From: Canada
Member No.: 37



I'm interested in knowing how you lay your cork roadbed, right from marking the trackplan on the base, glueing it down, how do you fit the cork around the turnouts, what type of glue do you use, do you paint the roadbed, etc, etc, etc. In short, what step-by-step process do you use . Pointers to any websites that detail the process would be appreciated.


--------------------
Visit "Railways of Eastern Ontario" at
http://www.railwaybob.com
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
NYCandHR
post Dec 4 2002, 07:01 AM
Post #2


Moderator
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 547
Joined: 15-November 02
From: USA
Member No.: 19



Well Bob-

After drawing the track center lines, I split the cork down the seam into two pieces. I butt the square side of one piece up against the centerline and use Atlas(?) track spikes to hold the cork in place. I then repeat for the other piece on down the line. I do not use glue. I use a small tack hammer for the spikes.

For turnouts I cut an angle across one end after splicing and shape the end to match the contour of the main cork. I butt this up and spike down.

Some people paint the cork. I have seen brown and grey used a lot. Mostly the cork is painted if ballast is not going to be used. It seems to be prefference.

I am sure others have some more pointers.

I "stole" this from http://www.trainweb.org/begmr/tw.htm

[QUOTE=Converted Post]Roadbed

First, choose the type of roadbed you want. You can skip this part if you wish, but most modelers prefer the sound deadening qualities and the realistic appearance that roadbed provides. Roadbed is an underlayment between the track and the plywood surface.

There are many different types of roadbed available, but the most widely used is cork roadbed. It is usually sold is strips 3 feet long, and is made for a specific scale. The following is how to install roadbed:

1: Mark the layout plan on the plywood. Be sure to be as accurate as possible in this step.
2: The best way of doing this is by using the track pieces themselves.
3: The roadbed should split down the middle, at an angle. Split the pieces, and place the pieces side by side with the angled edges on the outsides.
4: Lay a bead of white glue, and place the roadbed over the plan. (It is helpful if you tack or pin the pieces to keep them from moving, but these don't have to be permanent)
5: For turnouts, you need to cut the pieces to fit.
6: Lightly sand the tops of the roadbed to ensure a smooth surface for track, when the glue dries.



Joel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cowcatcher
post Dec 6 2002, 01:55 PM
Post #3


Moderator
*****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 1,325
Joined: 13-November 02
From: USA
Member No.: 4



I used to do it just like Joel although I have always glued it using white glue.

I don't use it now although I might try it again in the future. Now I use extruded foam with Woodland Senics foam track bed. I glue the WS to the extruded foam and the track to the WS. I use Arleene's Tacky Glue which is similar to regular Elmers glue but thicker and tackier. I hold it in place for about 20 minutes with map pins then it is secure enough to move on.

The above method is real easy to correct if you want to change things. Simple pull it up gently, peel off the dried glue and start over.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
NYC
post Dec 6 2002, 06:22 PM
Post #4


Engineer
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 1,291
Joined: 13-November 02
From: USA
Member No.: 7



I also use Tacky glue but if you do use white glue and want to move it, just soak the area with water and the glue will soften up anyways.


--------------------
Phil
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bonkyrail
post Dec 7 2002, 05:51 AM
Post #5


Official Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 130
Joined: 17-November 02
From: USA
Member No.: 24



First, I usually get a nice bottle of wine and chill it while the cork and I are out at a movie, dinner or dancing. When we get home out comes the wine and soon the cork is putty in my hands. [biglaugh][biglaugh][biglaugh]


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Railway Bob
post Dec 7 2002, 01:32 PM
Post #6


Crew Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 94
Joined: 19-November 02
From: Canada
Member No.: 37



Hey Mike. Don't you just love those real serious people! It's difficult typing this response while I'm trying to hold my sides to stop laughing.


--------------------
Visit "Railways of Eastern Ontario" at
http://www.railwaybob.com
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bonkyrail
post Dec 7 2002, 02:22 PM
Post #7


Official Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 130
Joined: 17-November 02
From: USA
Member No.: 24



Bob, I simply cound NOT resist that one! I've promised everyone I'd be a good boy, but when someone asks how to lay cork I can't let it slip by.

To add something useful: First I layed the track in its entirety. Then I spray painted it all a nice dark flat brown to get the ties brown and woody looking and to get those rails brown on the sides. It also served to mark the subroadbed as to where all the track would be and provided a beautiful guide for the cork to follow. Next I got the box of cork out, and one strip at a time I split them in half, glued 1/2 of the strip using elmers white glue down on where the tracks were marked - with the edge running dead center of the rails and secured it with a track nail partially inserted and easily removed later. Then the other half got glued down right next to it, staggered an inch to avoid any joint issues and remembered to sand the rough edge off as I went. Then repeat until done.

Turnouts were trickier and involved cutting and trimming, but it was really a matter of laying the routes of cork under the turnouts and scoring where they would be cut. I did it all in a day.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Railway Bob
post Dec 8 2002, 10:23 AM
Post #8


Crew Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 94
Joined: 19-November 02
From: Canada
Member No.: 37



So, with the bevel on half of the cork roadbed, what are some of the tricks of the trade to fit the around the turnouts? Presumably, each half of the cork roadbed will split around the turnout with one half going straight ahead and the other half taking the diverging route. So, what methods do you use to fit two more halves into this wedge?


--------------------
Visit "Railways of Eastern Ontario" at
http://www.railwaybob.com
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
NYC
post Dec 8 2002, 01:46 PM
Post #9


Engineer
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 1,291
Joined: 13-November 02
From: USA
Member No.: 7



You are correct on the two diverging, I then lay another half on the straight section cutting the diverging section to fit the straight one. I then do the same with the inside of the diverging section cutting the straight one so that it will fit. This interlocks them before I even glue the inside ones down.


--------------------
Phil
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jimfitch
post Dec 13 2002, 09:00 PM
Post #10


Engineer
*****

Group: Banned
Posts: 1,302
Joined: 13-November 02
From: USA
Member No.: 3



I do it like Joel does it, the OLD FASHION way.

I have a reason for doing it the old fashion way too. I don't like to use glue on the early parts of my construction. I think it makes sense to allow yourself the option of removing track, cork and other things until you are in the final stages. Glue tends to be perminent as a rule, and anything glued down tends to be damaged when it is torn out.

If you use spikes or Atlas track nails, like I use, you can simply tug them out with needle nose pliers and there is little or not damage to the cork, should you need to pull it up and relay it differently.

Of course, this all assumes you are using either homosote or plywood/waferboard as your base. Many folks use foam these days as there base. Here is my thoughts on foam. The only compelling reason for me to use foam as an underlayment for track is it's light weight nature. In a basement or garage, you really don't need to have some thing be lightweight. However, if you want your layout components to be portable, then weight is very important. Thus, under circumstances where portability is necessary, you would be compelled to use foam and thus you would have to use glue by necessity to hold down cork and track.


--------------------
<font size="4"><font color="orange">Rio Grande - The Action Road</font id="orange"></font id="size4">
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 1st October 2014 - 03:18 PM